Event / Program Detail

February 17th, 2015 at Dallas City Performance Hall

2520 Flora Street, Dallas, Texas 75201 (map it)

Main Event at 8:00 PM

Crawford Seeger: Music for Small Orchestra

Slow, pensive
In roguish humor. Not fast

Copland: Appalachian Spring Suite (Original)

Very Slowly
Allegro
Moderato (The Bride & Her Intended)
Fast (The Revivalist & His Flock)
Subito Allegro (Solo Dance of the Bride)
As at first (Slowly)
Doppio movimento (Variations on a Shaker Hymn; Simple Gifts)
Moderato – Coda

Film: Bumping Into Broadway

Film Score Composed by Rolfe Kent

Commissioned by the Dallas Chamber Symphony

After some witty observations on the glamour of the Broadway scene the film tells the story of “The Girl” and “The Boy”, she a chorus line girl and he a writer. They both struggle to make it big and have trouble paying their rent in a boarding house run by a stern landlady with a simian tough-guy bailiff character. The Girl is fired and The Boy tries to get to the Musical Director to pitch his play. After rejection and numerous antics The Boy wins big in gaming and ends up with The Girl.

After Party Around 9:30 PM

Ticket holders can meet the performers over complimentary appetizers at Jorge’s Tex-Mex Cafe, just across the street, immediately following the event. Open seating will be available, inside the restaurant and outside on the patio.

Parking

Convenient parking for $5 is available across the street at One Arts Plaza.

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Directions

Dallas City Performance Hall is located downtown in the Arts District.

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Tickets By Phone

 214.449.1294

9:00am – 5:00pm, Monday – Friday
Voicemails accepted.

Online

Pricing

Reserved Seating: $19-49

Regular through VIP, Select Your Seat

At the Door

Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the lobby, which opens 90 minutes before the event start time. Cash and major credit cards are accepted.

What People Are Saying

  • "McKay and the musicians wove through the complex textures and often counter-intuitive wanderings of this score with admirable devotion and precision."

    Wayne Lee Gay D Magazine
  • "...the Dallas Chamber Symphony and the Bruce Wood Dance Company...make an ideal cultural ambassador for the city to major urban centers in the United States and beyond."

    Wayne Lee Gay D Magazine
  • "McKay and the musicians wove through the complex textures and often counter-intuitive wanderings of this score with admirable devotion and precision."

    Wayne Lee Gay D Magazine
  • "Best Way to Watch A Silent Film 2014: ...they showed us that there’s nothing quite like watching a movie to the sound of a live orchestra."

    The Editor D Magazine
  • "The mostly young ensemble of two dozen strings responded with performances as eager and expressive as they were accomplished."

    Scott Cantrell The Dallas Morning News
  • "For this symphony the educational outreach is far-reaching."

    Teresa Frosini CBS 11 News
  • "…the orchestra here demonstrated a continually improving precision and comfort in a room that can be unforgiving. The Warlock Suite provided ample opportunity for McKay to show off a wonderful ability to evoke the special atmosphere, at once modern and archaic, that the composer created here."

    Wayne Lee Gay D Magazine
  • "Renaissance harmonies abounded, tinged with just the right spice of 20th Century dissonance and bi-tonality. It was brought out at just the right level by McKay."

    Wayne Lee Gay D Magazine
  • "The pointed intentionality of last night's programming, which initially looked like a musical mishmash, was to breathe new life into the old. And the structure of it was brilliant: 'Here's something you'll know. Here's something you should know. And here's something fun, so you leave feeling elated.'"

    Jamie Laughlin The Dallas Observer
  • "The Dallas Chamber Symphony is nothing if not ambitious."

    Katie Womack Dallas Observer
  • "This combination of old and new elements helped transport the audience to a different time and place without over-doing musical clichés."

    Katie Womack The Dallas Observer
  • "The audience was drawn into the film from the start, bursting into laughter and interacting with the story audibly."

    Katie Womack The Dallas Observer
  • "On Tuesday night, the Dallas Chamber Symphony proved they know exactly how to create a well-executed, interactive and entertaining live music/film screening experience."

    Katie Womack The Dallas Observer
  • "They have some incredible talent in their midst."

    Katie Womack The Dallas Observer
  • "There were a lot of excited whispers and shoulder grabs as people stood up to leave. I rarely see crowds so invigorated after classical productions."

    Jamie Laughlin The Dallas Observer
  • "If we want to keep classical music relevant, we need to fuse it naturally with our other passions. It should be an accompaniment to our lives, not just a fancy auditory meal gobbled up occasionally while wearing fine clothes. The Dallas Chamber Symphony is making that happen."

    Jamie Laughlin The Dallas Observer
  • "Shows like this reinforce that I'm on board; I'll see anything this group and its artistic director Richard McKay tries…"

    Jamie Laughlin The Dallas Observer
  • "Dallas Chamber Symphony has, along with the presentation of a fresh and widely varied repertoire of standard and non-standard works, carved a notable niche on the local scene…"

    Wayne Lee Gay D Magazine
  • "The orchestra and conductor McKay deserve hearty accolades for this ongoing silent cinema project, with hope that it will continue to enrich the local scene in upcoming seasons."

    Wayne Lee Gay D Magazine
  • "McKay had a great sense for the tempo and character of the piece, which was clearly chosen to show off Takagi's technical and artistic skill."

    Katie Womack The Dallas Observer
  • "As they had been all night, phrases were beautifully shaped. Throughout the performance there was palpable emotion in the playing and ultimately that intangible -- artistic sensibility -- is what made this concert a success."

    Katie Womack The Dallas Observer
  • "The conductor’s long-term vision is precisely the kind of eclectic and occasionally challenging classical group Dallas really needs."

    Peter Simek D Magazine
  • "Everything from the first note was locked in rhythmic precision, and difficult passages were clear, focused, and musical..."

    John Norine TheaterJones
  • "The ensemble is extremely adroit in their presentation as well as programming."

    John Norine TheaterJones

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Rolfe Kent, composer

Rolfe Kent, Dallas Chamber Symphony“Kent’s great gift… is his timbral control. He mixes sound colors beautifully, even allowing in moments of spoken voice that are so fleeting and subdued that they become another musical instrument.” — Andrew Granade, SoundtrackNet

Unexpected texture, sounds and a signature musical personality are the hallmarks of British film composer Rolfe Kent, who has scored more than 50 films, including Academy Award nominated UP IN THE AIR (for which he won a Golden Satellite award), SIDEWAYS (for which he was nominated for a Golden Globe and Critics Choice Award in 2007), YOUNG ADULT, CHARLIE ST. CLOUD, ABOUT SCHMIDT, ELECTION, MEAN GIRLS, LEGALLY BLONDE and LEGALLY BLONDE II, WEDDING CRASHERS, THE MATADOR, REIGN OVER ME, THE HUNTING PARTY, THE GHOSTS OF GIRLFRIENDS PAST, and THANK YOU FOR SMOKING. Kent also composed the Emmy-nominated main title theme for the Showtime hit, DEXTER. In 2012, he received the Richard Kirk award for career achievement.

Born in England into a non-musical family, Kent intuitively felt at age 12 that he wanted to be a film composer, although his early musical training was brief and not so formal. Citing Jarre’s Lawrence of Arabia and Morricone’s The Good, The Bad and the Ugly, as inspirations, Kent took the advice of an early music teacher to avoid rigid course work that would dampen his enthusiasm. He followed an entirely different path and, taking counterpoint to what is often cited as culture mired in cynicism, profited from his early course work in theology to relate it to music. After enrolling in psychology studies at University of Leeds in Yorkshire, Kent’s musical career was casually begun at a dance club when the director of a play offered him a chance to “do” the music. His jump-start was his composition for a stage musical Gross at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, a springboard for authors, composers and performers.

In the confines of his musically busy studio, one can immediately see why his musical personality is as distinct and his own. Constantly on the go, adventurous and curious, Kent has developed a style that is not only distinct, but indicative of his aversion to the-anticipated-score in tone, texture and rhythm. The walls are lined with many familiar and many more unfamiliar instruments, gingerly handled and gleefully demonstrated for their sonic qualities. Among his collection are the Indonesian percussion instrument the angklung, the shawm (first used in military maneuvers as a psychological weapon), the melodica, used for the light, soothing effect in Kent’s jazz-infused score for his Golden Globe-nominated Sideways, and an instrument he discovered and cannot name that sounds like the world’s beaches at their most romantic high tide… combined.

At first blush, Kent takes his initial cue from the film’s director and infuses it with his own voice, striving to make the difference between looking at a film and being absorbed by it. In Jason Reitman’s LABOR DAY Kent took intimate instrumentation, including guitars, charango and sounds of crickets, and processed them to create intense moody ambiences, at once both organic and other-worldly, delicately navigating a line between tension and emotion.

In addition to Reitman, Kent has the distinction of attracting and sustaining relationships with directors as popular and diverse as Alexander Payne, Mark Waters, Richard Shepard, and Burr Steers. Kent’s most recent films include LABOR DAY (Jason Reitman), DOM HEMINGWAY (Richard Shepard), BAD WORDS (film directorial debut of Jason Bateman) THE SCAPEGOAT (Nicolas Bary), and the French/Chinese animation LE PRINCE ET LES 108 DEMONS.

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