Event / Program Detail

October 2nd, 2012 at Dallas City Performance Hall

2520 Flora Street, Dallas, Texas 75201 (map it)

Main Event at 8:00 PM

Brahms: Ballades Op. 10

No. 1 in D Minor: Andante
No. 2 in D Major: Andante
No. 3 in B Minor: Intermezzo; Allegro
No. 4 in B Major: Andante con moto

Rachmaninoff: Transcription for Piano

Kreisler’s “Liebesleid” and “Liebesfreud” 

Rachmaninoff: Five Preludes

Op. 3, No 2 in C sharp Minor
Op. 23, No. 10 in G flat Major
Op. 23, No. 5 in G Minor
Op. 32, No. 12 in G sharp Minor
Op. 23, No. 2 in B flat Major

Ravel: La Valse

Parking

Convenient parking for $5 is available across the street at One Arts Plaza.

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Dallas City Performance Hall is located downtown in the Arts District.

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Tickets By Phone

 214.449.1294

9:00am – 5:00pm, Monday – Friday
Voicemails accepted.

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Pricing

Reserved Seating: $19-49

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At the Door

Tickets can be purchased at the box office in the lobby, which opens 90 minutes before the event start time. Cash and major credit cards are accepted.

What People Are Saying

  • "McKay and the musicians wove through the complex textures and often counter-intuitive wanderings of this score with admirable devotion and precision."

    Wayne Lee Gay D Magazine
  • "...the Dallas Chamber Symphony and the Bruce Wood Dance Company...make an ideal cultural ambassador for the city to major urban centers in the United States and beyond."

    Wayne Lee Gay D Magazine
  • "McKay and the musicians wove through the complex textures and often counter-intuitive wanderings of this score with admirable devotion and precision."

    Wayne Lee Gay D Magazine
  • "Best Way to Watch A Silent Film 2014: ...they showed us that there’s nothing quite like watching a movie to the sound of a live orchestra."

    The Editor D Magazine
  • "The mostly young ensemble of two dozen strings responded with performances as eager and expressive as they were accomplished."

    Scott Cantrell The Dallas Morning News
  • "For this symphony the educational outreach is far-reaching."

    Teresa Frosini CBS 11 News
  • "…the orchestra here demonstrated a continually improving precision and comfort in a room that can be unforgiving. The Warlock Suite provided ample opportunity for McKay to show off a wonderful ability to evoke the special atmosphere, at once modern and archaic, that the composer created here."

    Wayne Lee Gay D Magazine
  • "Renaissance harmonies abounded, tinged with just the right spice of 20th Century dissonance and bi-tonality. It was brought out at just the right level by McKay."

    Wayne Lee Gay D Magazine
  • "The pointed intentionality of last night's programming, which initially looked like a musical mishmash, was to breathe new life into the old. And the structure of it was brilliant: 'Here's something you'll know. Here's something you should know. And here's something fun, so you leave feeling elated.'"

    Jamie Laughlin The Dallas Observer
  • "The Dallas Chamber Symphony is nothing if not ambitious."

    Katie Womack Dallas Observer
  • "This combination of old and new elements helped transport the audience to a different time and place without over-doing musical clichés."

    Katie Womack The Dallas Observer
  • "The audience was drawn into the film from the start, bursting into laughter and interacting with the story audibly."

    Katie Womack The Dallas Observer
  • "On Tuesday night, the Dallas Chamber Symphony proved they know exactly how to create a well-executed, interactive and entertaining live music/film screening experience."

    Katie Womack The Dallas Observer
  • "They have some incredible talent in their midst."

    Katie Womack The Dallas Observer
  • "There were a lot of excited whispers and shoulder grabs as people stood up to leave. I rarely see crowds so invigorated after classical productions."

    Jamie Laughlin The Dallas Observer
  • "If we want to keep classical music relevant, we need to fuse it naturally with our other passions. It should be an accompaniment to our lives, not just a fancy auditory meal gobbled up occasionally while wearing fine clothes. The Dallas Chamber Symphony is making that happen."

    Jamie Laughlin The Dallas Observer
  • "Shows like this reinforce that I'm on board; I'll see anything this group and its artistic director Richard McKay tries…"

    Jamie Laughlin The Dallas Observer
  • "Dallas Chamber Symphony has, along with the presentation of a fresh and widely varied repertoire of standard and non-standard works, carved a notable niche on the local scene…"

    Wayne Lee Gay D Magazine
  • "The orchestra and conductor McKay deserve hearty accolades for this ongoing silent cinema project, with hope that it will continue to enrich the local scene in upcoming seasons."

    Wayne Lee Gay D Magazine
  • "McKay had a great sense for the tempo and character of the piece, which was clearly chosen to show off Takagi's technical and artistic skill."

    Katie Womack The Dallas Observer
  • "As they had been all night, phrases were beautifully shaped. Throughout the performance there was palpable emotion in the playing and ultimately that intangible -- artistic sensibility -- is what made this concert a success."

    Katie Womack The Dallas Observer
  • "The conductor’s long-term vision is precisely the kind of eclectic and occasionally challenging classical group Dallas really needs."

    Peter Simek D Magazine
  • "Everything from the first note was locked in rhythmic precision, and difficult passages were clear, focused, and musical..."

    John Norine TheaterJones
  • "The ensemble is extremely adroit in their presentation as well as programming."

    John Norine TheaterJones

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Alessio Bax, piano

Alessio Bax, Dallas Chamber SymphonyPianist Alessio Bax creates “a ravishing listening experience” with his lyrical playing, insightful interpretations, and dazzling facility. “His playing quivers with an almost hypnotic intensity,” says Gramophone magazine, leading to whatDallas Morning News calls “an out-of-body experience.”First Prize winner at the Leeds and Hamamatsu international piano competitions—and a 2009 Avery Fisher Career Grant recipient—he has appeared as soloist with over 100 orchestras, including the London and Royal Philharmonic orchestras, the Dallas and Houston symphonies, the NHK Symphony in Japan, the St. Petersburg Philharmonic with Yuri Temirkanov, and the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra with Sir Simon Rattle.

After a whirlwind summer playing fourteen festivals on three continents, including his Minnesota Orchestra debut under Andrew Litton and return to Bravo! Vail with the Dallas Symphony led by Jaap van Zweden, Bax opens the Colorado Symphony’s 2015-16 season, and launches a South American recital tour, crowned by three concerts at the famed Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires. With violinist Joshua Bell, he embarks on a tour of Asia, collaborates for the first time with the Emerson String Quartet, plays four-hand piano concerts with Lucille Chung in Canada, and returns to the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center for engagements in New York and on tour. Among his solo recitals, Bax performs in the Cliburn Concerts series in Ft. Worth. September brings the release of his next solo album for Signum Classics, featuring music by Mussorgsky and Scriabin.

Highlights of recent seasons include Beethoven and Rachmaninov in a UK tour with the Royal Philharmonic, Rachmaninov and Mozart with the St. Petersburg Philharmonic under Temirkanov, Barber with the Dallas Symphony under Jaap van Zweden, Mozart with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra under Hans Graf, Rachmaninov with London’s Southbank Sinfonia led by Vladimir Ashkenazy, and Mozart with the same orchestra under Simon Over, as well as concerts at London’s Wigmore Hall, L.A.’s Disney Hall, Washington’s Kennedy Center, and New York’s Carnegie Hall. He opened – with a pair of Mozart piano concertos – and closed the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center’s 2014-15 season. Besides giving solo recitals at the Lincoln Center and in Atlanta, Baltimore, Dallas, Minneapolis, Bilbao, and Tokyo, Bax partnered with Joshua Bell for over thirty concerts in Europe and North and South America, and with Lucille Chung in the U.S., Canada, France, and Hong Kong.In 2013, he received the Andrew Wolf Chamber Music Award and Lincoln Center’s Martin E. Segal Award, which recognizes young artists of exceptional accomplishment.

Bax’s celebrated discography for Signum Classics includes Beethoven’s “Hammerklavier” and “Moonlight” Sonatas (Gramophone “Editor’s Choice”); Bax & Chung, a duo disc with Lucille Chung, presenting Stravinsky’s original four-hand version of the ballet Pétrouchka as well as music by Brahms and Piazzolla; Alessio Bax plays Mozart, comprising Piano Concertos K. 491 and K. 595 with London’s Southbank Sinfonia led by Simon Over; Alessio Bax plays Brahms(Gramophone “Critic’s Choice”); Rachmaninov: Preludes and Melodies (American Record Guide “Critics’ Choice 2011”); and Bach Transcribed; and for Warner Classics, Baroque Reflections (Gramophone “Editor’s Choice”). He performed Beethoven’s “Hammerklavier” Sonata for maestro Daniel Barenboim in the PBS-TV documentaryBarenboim on Beethoven: Masterclass, available as a DVD box set on the EMI label. His performances have been broadcast live on the BBC (UK); CBC (Canada); RAI (Italy); RTVE (Spain); NHK (Japan); WDR, NDR, and Bayerischer Rundfunk (Germany); American Public Media’s “Performance Today”; WQXR (New York); WGBH (Boston); WETA (Washington, DC); and Sirius-XM satellite radio, among many others.

Hailed by International Piano as “a pianist of refreshing depth,” Bax’s extensive concerto repertoire has led to performances with such esteemed conductors as Vladimir Ashkenazy, Marin Alsop, Sergiu Commisiona, Vernon Handley, Pietari Inkinen, Hannu Lintu, Andrew Litton, Jonathan Nott, Vasily Petrenko, Sir Simon Rattle, Alexander Shelley, Yuri Temirkanov, and Jaap van Zweden. His international festival appearances include London’s International Piano Series (Queen Elizabeth Hall); the Verbier Festival in Switzerland; England’s Aldeburgh and Bath festivals; and the Ruhr Klavier-Festival and Beethovenfest Bonn in Germany. He has also appeared multiple times at such U.S. festivals as Bravo! Vail, Bard Music Festival, Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, and Music@Menlo, and has given recitals in major music halls around the world, including in Rome, Milan, Madrid, Mexico City, Paris, London, Tel Aviv, Tokyo, Seoul, Hong Kong, New York, and Washington, DC. An accomplished chamber musician, Bax has collaborated with Emanuel Ax, Joshua Bell, Sol Gabetta, Steven Isserlis, Nicholas Phan, Paul Watkins, and Jörg Widmann, among others.

Alessio Bax graduated with top honors at the record age of 14 from the conservatory of his hometown in Bari, Italy, where his teacher was Angela Montemurro. He studied in France with Francois-Joël Thiollier and attended the Chigiana Academy in Siena under Joaquín Achúcarro. In 1994 he moved to Dallas to continue his studies with Achúcarro at SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, and he is now on the teaching faculty there. A Steinway artist, Bax resides in New York City with his wife, pianist Lucille Chung, and their daughter.

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